VR/AR

Mobile World Congress 2018: Audio is Almost Getting the Attention it Deserves

The 2018 Mobile World Congress has come and gone. Dirac was in attendance once again this year, and we left the event filled with a very promising feeling. And not at all thanks to the weather—which turned out to be the worst ever since we started attending the event back in 2006—but thanks to all the great people we had the pleasure of meeting, along with the equally great meetings we held with partners, journalists, and potential customers. 

How VR/AR Can Give Teleconferencing a Much Needed Makeover

In today’s global business environment, the ability to work remotely offers a huge work life improvement and ultimately saves on travel and environmental costs. One thing still holding us back, however, is the lack of proper teleconferencing systems. Despite the various solutions available, attempting to work remotely and conduct conference calls with 5-10 people located in various places across the globe is a hugely disappointing and unproductive experience.

3 Audio Trends Spotted at the 2017 Mobile World Congress

The Mobile World Congress (MWC) takes place in Barcelona every year. With over 100,000 exhibitors and visitors, it's by far the most important event in the industry. It also offers a key to understanding the trends of the future—not only in the mobile industry but in relation to how we live our lives. Mobile goes beyond mobile phones and everything you can think of is getting connected. Including some things you might not even imagine. 

CES 2017 Highlights, as Experienced from the Dirac Suite

It’s hard not to write something after returning from an event like CES, which leaves you with so many inputs and impressions, it nearly blows your mind. The entire place is so packed with innovations and ideas, it's like the entire world’s waited all year just to reveal what they've been busy hatching up in the seclusion of their basement. 

In HiFi, Virtual Reality Might Be Better Than Reality

As I write this, I'm listening to a recording of Joss Stone. Her voice sounds completely natural, hovering in the air just a few meters in front of me, placed distinctly at the center of my sound system, remaining there regardless of how I move my head. I can almost touch the ambience of the recording. The low frequency extension is great, the room modes are extremely well controlled. The listening room is remarkably well treated, with just the right amount of air and sense of space, and without the annoyance of comb filters or spectral coloration. It’s treated so well, I don’t need digital room correction. This is an experience you can’t get without a HiFi and room treatment budget of at least $100,000 USD. The funny fact is this: I’m getting this experience with a pair of headphones. And the sound system I’m referring to? It’s a virtual one.